While DSLRs are rife with workarounds and compromises, the NEX-FS100U is built from the ground up for moving pictures. And it shows. You get the benefits of DSLR shooting--including luscious depth of focus control and compatibility with a world of 35mm SLR, DSLR & specialty lenses--while minimizing the dreaded aliasing, the infamous "jello-cam" and the notorious overheating that can affect DSLRs. If you really want to shoot digital motion pictures, use a real digital motion picture camera. The Sony FS100U.

While DSLRs are rife with workarounds and compromises, the NEX-FS100U is built from the ground up for moving pictures. And it shows. You get the benefits of DSLR shooting--including luscious depth of focus control and compatibility with a world of 35mm SLR, DSLR & specialty lenses--while minimizing the dreaded aliasing, the infamous "jello-cam" and the notorious overheating that can affect DSLRs. If you really want to shoot digital motion pictures, use a real digital motion picture camera. The Sony FS100U.

Super 35mm image sensor

When it comes to image sensors, size definitely matters. Other things being equal, a bigger sensor equates to better low-light sensitivity and lower image noise. Bigger sensors also make it easier to capture wide-angle shots; the field of view is wider for any given focal length lens. Even more important to some photographers is the pursuit of "bokeh," the defocused backgrounds made possible by shallow depth of field. A common technique for directing audience attention within the frame, shallow depth of field is far easier to achieve with a large sensor. And that's exactly what the NEX-FS100U delivers, with a single sensor that closely approximates the Super 35mm motion picture frame size.read more

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Super 35mm image sensor

When it comes to image sensors, size definitely matters. Other things being equal, a bigger sensor equates to better low-light sensitivity and lower image noise. Bigger sensors also make it easier to capture wide-angle shots; the field of view is wider for any given focal length lens. Even more important to some photographers is the pursuit of "bokeh," the defocused backgrounds made possible by shallow depth of field. A common technique for directing audience attention within the frame, shallow depth of field is far easier to achieve with a large sensor. And that's exactly what the NEX-FS100U delivers, with a single sensor that closely approximates the Super 35mm motion picture frame size.


The NEX-FS100U sensor has nearly twice as much surface area as the Micro Four Thirds sensor in 16:9 operation.

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Interchangeable lenses

Non-professionals imagine that cameras take pictures. Professionals understand that to a large extent, it is the lens that takes the picture. After all, the lens controls your field of vision, focus, and aperture. The NEX-FS100U is a platform for interchangeable lenses--a simple fact that multiplies your photographic possibilities.read more

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Changing lenses is an essential component of creative control.

Interchangeable lenses

Non-professionals imagine that cameras take pictures. Professionals understand that to a large extent, it is the lens that takes the picture. After all, the lens controls your field of vision, focus, and aperture. The NEX-FS100U is a platform for interchangeable lenses--a simple fact that multiplies your photographic possibilities.

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File-based workflow

The NEX-FS100U represents a straight line from image acquisition to post production. In the edit bay, the popular AVCHDTM codec enables file-based operation with select nonlinear editors. The modest bitrate of AVCHD recording also enables fast, easy file transfers over data networks and affordable storage on hard disk arrays. Instead of burdening your production with data wrangling and backup headaches, Sony provides robust, reliable solutions.

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File-based workflow

The NEX-FS100U represents a straight line from image acquisition to post production. In the edit bay, the popular AVCHDTM codec enables file-based operation with select nonlinear editors. The modest bitrate of AVCHD recording also enables fast, easy file transfers over data networks and affordable storage on hard disk arrays. Instead of burdening your production with data wrangling and backup headaches, Sony provides robust, reliable solutions.

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Choice of 24p, 30p, 60p or 60i

The NEX-FS100U shoots at the cherished 24 frames per second image rate. The FS100U captures progressive frames at 24 or 30 fps. For smoother rendering of fast action, the camcorder even shoots at 1080/60p with an enhanced data rate of 28 Mbps. For projects destined for broadcast, the FS100U also captures 720/60p and 1080/60i.

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Choice of 24p, 30p, 60p or 60i

The NEX-FS100U shoots at the cherished 24 frames per second image rate. The FS100U captures progressive frames at 24 or 30 fps. For smoother rendering of fast action, the camcorder even shoots at 1080/60p with an enhanced data rate of 28 Mbps. For projects destined for broadcast, the FS100U also captures 720/60p and 1080/60i.

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Slow & Quick Motion

The choice of frame rates is not a purely technical issue. Slow motion can underscore the emotion of a scene, while quick motion can inject a touch of humor. The NEX-FS100U provides Slow & Quick Motion, shooting at a maximum frame rate of 1920x1080/60p (28 Mbps). This enables gorgeous, Full HD slow motion when played back at 24p or 30p.

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Slow & Quick Motion

The choice of frame rates is not a purely technical issue. Slow motion can underscore the emotion of a scene, while quick motion can inject a touch of humor. The NEX-FS100U provides Slow & Quick Motion, shooting at a maximum frame rate of 1920x1080/60p (28 Mbps). This enables gorgeous, Full HD slow motion when played back at 24p or 30p.

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Sony E Series lens mount

The Sony Alpha NEX-3 and NEX-5 cameras marked the debut of a new lens mount, designed expressly for mirror-less interchangeable lens cameras that shoot stills, video or both. Because video shooting was a consideration from the outset, Sony E MountTM lenses have far quieter focusing motors than conventional AF still lenses. Your videos are less likely to be interrupted by the whine of AF motor noise. E Mount lenses currently include a 16mm F2.8 wide angle "pancake" lens (SEL16F28), an 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 OSS zoom lens with Optical SteadyShotTM image stabilization (SEL1855) and an 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 OSS zoom with Optical SteadyShot image stabilization (SEL18200).read more

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Sony E Series lens mount

The Sony Alpha NEX-3 and NEX-5 cameras marked the debut of a new lens mount, designed expressly for mirror-less interchangeable lens cameras that shoot stills, video or both. Because video shooting was a consideration from the outset, Sony E MountTM lenses have far quieter focusing motors than conventional AF still lenses. Your videos are less likely to be interrupted by the whine of AF motor noise. E Mount lenses currently include a 16mm F2.8 wide angle "pancake" lens (SEL16F28), an 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 OSS zoom lens with Optical SteadyShotTM image stabilization (SEL1855) and an 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 OSS zoom with Optical SteadyShot image stabilization (SEL18200).

Sony has big plans for the E Mount lens lineup.

The NEX-3 and NEX-5 cameras are amazingly popular worldwide. Encouraged by this burgeoning customer base, Sony intends to expand the line of E Mount lenses, even adding G Lenses, Sony's highly-regarded optics. There's more. Third-party lens manufacturers, including Cosina, Sigma, Tamron and Carl Zeiss, have announced plans to make their own lenses for Sony's E Mount cameras.

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A universe of 35mm lenses

The NEX-FS100U is your gateway to an enormous range of 35mm lenses including SLR, DSLR and specialty glass. The worldwide success of Sony's NEX-3 and NEX-5 E Mount cameras, combined with the E Mount system's unusually short 18mm flange-back distance has created a wealth of opportunities. Photo enthusiasts have discovered that many classic lens series will cover this NEX-5 sensor via simple third-party adaptors. Not only do these adaptors enable you to attach a broad range of primes and zooms, but you can even use specialty lenses including tilt-shift and bellows models, for extraordinary creative freedom.read more

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A universe of 35mm lenses

The NEX-FS100U is your gateway to an enormous range of 35mm lenses including SLR, DSLR and specialty glass. The worldwide success of Sony's NEX-3 and NEX-5 E Mount cameras, combined with the E Mount system's unusually short 18mm flange-back distance has created a wealth of opportunities. Photo enthusiasts have discovered that many classic lens series will cover this NEX-5 sensor via simple third-party adaptors. Not only do these adaptors enable you to attach a broad range of primes and zooms, but you can even use specialty lenses including tilt-shift and bellows models, for extraordinary creative freedom.


New life for timeless lenses: E Mount lens adaptors.

Adaptor for Sony A Mount lenses

An additional lens mount adaptor, the Sony LA-EA1, opens up the entire line of Sony A MountTM alpha lenses for use on the NEX-FS100U. The A Mount family currently includes more than 30 lenses, including Sony's premium G Series glass, classics such as the legendary 135mm Smooth Transition Focus and 500mm Reflex, plus a selection of Carl Zeiss® DistagonTM, PlanarTM, SonnarTM and Vario-SonnarTM primes and zooms.


Sony's LA-EA1 A Mount to E Mount adaptor and the current crop of Sony A Mount lenses.


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No line skipping; minimal aliasing

Professional photographers are finding out that if your camera is optimized for stills, it's compromised for moving pictures. That's why Sony built the NEX-FS100U around an all-new sensor, specifically dedicated to the demands of motion imaging. In fact, this is the same image sensor that is helping our PMW-F3 earn such rave reviews.read more

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No line skipping; minimal aliasing

Professional photographers are finding out that if your camera is optimized for stills, it's compromised for moving pictures. That's why Sony built the NEX-FS100U around an all-new sensor, specifically dedicated to the demands of motion imaging. In fact, this is the same image sensor that is helping our PMW-F3 earn such rave reviews.


For optimum moving pictures, the NEX-FS100U does not resort to line skipping, the concept of which is illustrated here.

A DSLR may have over 14 million pixels, but it may skip most of those pixels in order to capture HD video. This may have a pernicious side-effect: aliasing. DSLR shots can look good... until aliasing rears its ugly head. Repeating, lined patterns in clothing, buildings or household objects like venetian blinds can generate crazy patterns, absent in the original scene. What's worse, these patterns can move, distracting audiences from your story and your message. Because the NEX-FS100U incorporates an image sensor designed from the ground up for moving pictures, the Sony camera minimizes these distortions.

Even highly-regarded, professional-grade DSLRs can incur aliasing when shooting video. (Actual, unretouched video still.)

OLPF and pixel count optimized for moving pictures

Digital cameras typically require an optical low-pass filter (OLPF) placed directly in front of the image sensor to help control aliasing. On DSLRs, the OLPF is specifically designed for stills. That's one more reason why DSLRs can incur such severe aliasing when shooting video. The NEX-FS100U incorporates an OLPF optimized for moving pictures.

Where a typical DSLR will have 14 or more megapixels, the NEX-FS100U pixel count is optimized for shooting HD moving images. There are approximately 3.37 effective megapixels in 16:9 mode. Having one fourth the pixels enables each individual pixel to be four times the size. The result? A two-stop advantage in low-light sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio and dynamic range.

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Minimal "jello-cam"

Sony is a world leader in semiconductor image sensors and a leader in the fundamentals of CMOS technology. While CMOS sensors have many strengths, they can be susceptible to "jello-cam," a type of geometric distortion experienced with moving subjects. Jello-cam occurs because CMOS uses a rolling shutter where each row of pixels is exposed slightly after the row above.read more

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Minimal "jello-cam"

Sony is a world leader in semiconductor image sensors and a leader in the fundamentals of CMOS technology. While CMOS sensors have many strengths, they can be susceptible to "jello-cam," a type of geometric distortion experienced with moving subjects. Jello-cam occurs because CMOS uses a rolling shutter where each row of pixels is exposed slightly after the row above.


Jello-cam at work. Right-to-left subject motion causes the train's verticals to tilt, even while the foreground fence is unaffected. Sony Exmor CMOS technology minimizes this effect.

The operating principle of a rolling shutter CMOS image sensor.

Sony sought to minimize "jello-cam" by speeding up the readout process. Conventional CMOS sensors use only a handful of digital-to-analog converters, creating a traffic jam that slows down the readout process. Sony's ExmorTM CMOS design supplies each column of pixels with its own, dedicated converter. The sensor has literally hundreds of converters, reducing rolling shutter to a minimum.

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Improved AVCHDTM recording

Directors of photography are discovering that AVCHD recording represents a superb balance of high picture quality at low recorded bitrates. The benefits of high quality are obvious. Low bitrates are also important because they affect transfer speeds, network bandwidth requirements and storage costs in postproduction and archiving. Even among AVCHD camcorders, the NEX-FS100U stands apart.read more

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Improved AVCHDTM recording

Directors of photography are discovering that AVCHD recording represents a superb balance of high picture quality at low recorded bitrates. The benefits of high quality are obvious. Low bitrates are also important because they affect transfer speeds, network bandwidth requirements and storage costs in postproduction and archiving. Even among AVCHD camcorders, the NEX-FS100U stands apart.

  • New 28 Mbps recording. The NEX-FS100U is among the first camcorders to incorporate the highest AVCHD bitrate ever1: 28 Megabits per second (Mbps). In the FS100U, 28 Mbps is dedicated to 1080/60p recording.
  • Adaptive codec. Sony's proprietary implementation of AVCHD encoding is not only context sensitive, it's also operations-sensitive. When you adjust gain, the camera's control bus "tells" the encoder, which adjusts encoding parameters accordingly. When you boost the gain, the adaptive codec is smart enough to look out for digital "noise" in the dark areas of the scene. As a result, you get higher recording quality at amazingly low bitrates.

1. As of March 2011.

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Memory Stick® or SD/SDHC cards

The NEX-FS100U captures gorgeous images on highly affordable, widely available consumer media. You can choose Memory Stick PRO DuoTM cards or SD/SDHC cards, either of which is readily available in consumer electronics and camera stores.

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Memory Stick® or SD/SDHC cards

The NEX-FS100U captures gorgeous images on highly affordable, widely available consumer media. You can choose Memory Stick PRO DuoTM cards or SD/SDHC cards, either of which is readily available in consumer electronics and camera stores.

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HDMI® output

The NEX-FS100U outputs high-quality uncompressed video and audio over the HDMI version 1.4 interface. In addition, the interface outputs SMPTE timecode and 24p 3-2 pulldown flags to compatible systems.

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HDMI® output

The NEX-FS100U outputs high-quality uncompressed video and audio over the HDMI version 1.4 interface. In addition, the interface outputs SMPTE timecode and 24p 3-2 pulldown flags to compatible systems.

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Action Magazine: NEX camcorders in action

Go behind the scenes with Sony NEX camcorders. Click below to read the premiere issue of Action magazine.   read more

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Action Magazine: NEX camcorders in action

Go behind the scenes with Sony NEX camcorders. Click below to read the premiere issue of Action magazine.

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Christopher Webb captures the BMW M3 at Lime Rock

With only a two-day window to shoot a promotional documentary for limited edition car from a major auto manufacturer, cinematographer Christopher Webb chose Sony's NEX-FS100 professional compact camcorder for its compact size, image quality and performance. read more

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Christopher Webb captures the BMW M3 at Lime Rock

With only a two-day window to shoot a promotional documentary for limited edition car from a major auto manufacturer, cinematographer Christopher Webb chose Sony's NEX-FS100 professional compact camcorder for its compact size, image quality and performance.

Webb and the production team shot hours of content over two days at the historic Lime Rock Park racing circuit, using 21 Sony NEX-FS100's. Because of the camera's efficiency and the fact all the footage matched perfectly, the production team was able to edit and deliver the project within a tight two-week timeframe.

"This shoot was the perfect illustration of 'the right camera for the right job," said Webb, who directed the production. "This camera is more efficient, higher quality and is more reliable than anything in its class. With its size and mobility, we could be much more creative in setting up the shots we wanted. For this type of project, anything else would have been exponentially more expensive."

The content captured was produced into a variety of elements: 4:30, :30 and :16 spots as well as a 10-minute documentary.

The production only had access to the track and driver for two days, so they had to capture all the angles, shots and sound bites in a very short period of time. To accomplish this, the team estimated that 21 well-placed cameras would do the job, while avoiding a patchwork of cameras and workflows. The FS100 provided a truly all-in-one solution, helping reduce the amount of specialty vehicles and camera mounts required and allowing the team to be more creative because expensive equipment was less at risk and fewer grips and specialty personnel were needed to staff each position.

According to Webb, the unique nature of the car appeals to a very specific segment of the auto enthusiast and racing fan population. The production team also drew inspiration from classic racing films, like Steve McQueen's "Le Mans," which was important because, as Webb noted, the track itself presented some very unique challenges.

The next step was a series of meetings with the camera teams to get them to understand the different varying shots and angles that were needed, for example, a shot through the birch trees up a hill or down low on the corners right next to the car and other perspectives.

They wanted a camera that could adapt easily to all these shots, whether it meant putting some on tripods or in a chase car, or having a high-zoom lens attached to others, while others were set-up for interview capture.

"It was amazing to find a camera that would just do all of these things rather than having to configure and learn a new technology every time we had a different set-up," Webb said. "Our producing team was amazed because all of the filters were the same, all the tripods were the same; it was just the same thing all across the board. Usually I have four different cameras running on a job like that."

The Right Camera

Before production started, when camera choice was still undecided, the question of using other competitive video camera models, as well as DSLRs, was raised.

"We said no way," Webb said. "The FS100 was just the perfect fit. It allowed us to get a much better picture, a much higher quality video recording that we could easily color grade. To use the clients' words, 'capture a premium image in the car.' We were doing things with the FS100 that you just could not do with others."

For example, because of the versatility of the NEX-FS100, Webb and team we were able to simply extend two cameras on monopods off of another vehicle to chase the car around the track and get car-to-car shots.

"It was two of us with the FS100s on monopods," he said. "The car would come screaming by us and we would be under the bumper with the camera while someone else in that same vehicle had a camera mounted on the bumper. So we were getting all the same details, all at the same time."

No small feat, given the nature of the course. Over the two-day shoot, the teams dealt with sunlight, shadows, dirt, dust and more.

"Lime Rock Park is completely unique," Webb said. "It truly is a park, so it has grass, trees, rolling hills. When you drive a car like this on that track, it's like being strapped to a jack rabbit running through the woods. You're up a hill, you can't see what's around the corner, you're down through a bridge, then there's a short straightaway, then there's an S curve, it's just one continuous immediate emergency after another. It's just really hard to cover. You cannot have a camera on a tower, spin it around, and have it follow the car. You can only see the car for a few seconds and then it's gone."

The NEX-FS100's image capturing capabilities and color space truly proved to be a life-saver.

"We were outdoors, in bright sun, clouds, plus the car was bright orange," Webb said. "When we got all the footage back, most of it was perfect, but some was way over-exposed. The car was just completely milked out, but we were able to pull the color back out easily using the AVCHD workflow to match up all of that orange. And of course the M3 had to be that exact same orange in every shot. With the FS100, making that happen was no problem."

One unique perspective that the teams tried was a motion collage. They set up nine cameras, with each capturing a certain design detail of the car.

"We backed the car out of that composition," Webb said. "And then our editor was able to run those in reverse, so the car appears to be driving and stop in its perfect exact spot for every one of those nine individual compositions. You can see in the finished piece how she collage-cut them all at the same time. This is something that the client really loved and something that we never could have done with another camera."

High-quality Audio

While compelling footage of the car was critical, recording interviews with the drivers completed the story-telling. The team used the camera's XLR inputs to get not only audio associated with that picture, but supplemental audio so they could run a microphone down a hill under a bridge and run it back up with a transmitter to channel two on that camera.

"So, we could, for example, get an awesome Doppler effect sound," Webb said. "Or one camera in the car could record the driver's intercom and the other could be getting sound in the cockpit or sound from the exhaust. Our sound guys loved that, having the quality of the preamps and the XLR input."

He added, "we needed a really controlled, high end interview set and in that situation, we had two FS100s side-by-side doing a medium and a close up. I was able to walk onto that set as soon as the talent was mic'ed and ready, and operate one of those cameras. As soon as that interview was done, I could just go onto the next set with the camera." The production teams also were impressed by the e-mount camera's lens flexibility.

"I can put any lens on there, I can do crazy shift and tilt things, that I could never do on an Epic, on an Alexa, on a 5D, on any other camera, at any price point," he said. "So we were able to use cinema lenses, unique still lenses, macro lenses, tilt lenses, all kinds of things, on just one camera."

A Safety Net

Using 21 cameras on a shoot might normally sound technically challenging, but the camcorder's efficiency made the end-to-end workflow simple and efficient.

"It was unbelievable," Webb said. "It's all the same size, it's all the same codec, sorting through the data and looking at the creation date was easy, just all kinds of benefits. This camera gave us a major safety net, from a dollars-to-delivery perspective. Every time, we knew we had the shot and we knew we weren't going to get hurt. We felt very safe with it. We didn't have a single malfunction or error or failure with any one of those cameras in all of the pretty risky circumstances we were putting them in. This camera is just like a little wonderbox that we could configure in any mode we needed to at any moment."

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Mark Schimmel finds the Sony FS100 the "right tool" for the job

From his start designing movie posters to ultimately making films of his own, Mark Schimmel has gained a unique perspective on the production world. He's directed award-winning webisodes, short films, commercials, television shows, and videos, so he knows what it takes to deliver any type of project on time and under budget. read more

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Mark Schimmel finds the Sony FS100 the "right tool" for the job

From his start designing movie posters to ultimately making films of his own, Mark Schimmel has gained a unique perspective on the production world. He's directed award-winning webisodes, short films, commercials, television shows, and videos, so he knows what it takes to deliver any type of project on time and under budget.

An admitted film loyalist for much of his career, he's evolved his shooting style into the 35mm world – purchasing Sony's F3 and, more recently, the NEX-FS100 camcorder. While the new digital tools offer a broader canvas for telling his stories, Schimmel still approaches his work the same way he did in his early graphic design days.

"On any new project I always envision the finished version first, and then I work backwards to figure out the creative approach best suited to telling the story," Schimmel said. "The creative challenge in each new project is always related to storytelling. I conduct extensive research, sketch out dozens of ideas, and draw my own storyboard frames. I ask myself, ‘What am I not seeing?' as a producer, and look for red flags and unforeseen challenges."

Sony cameras help him overcome shooting challenges, especially in his current work as executive producer and director of the production company Once Upon a Time. He shoots about 20 projects a year, mostly marketing-related content and TV commercials. Recent projects include a commercial campaign for Wrangler and a webisode series titled "Find a Doctor" for Pennsylvania's Lehigh Valley Health Network (LVHN).

Mark Schimmel directing a recent project with Sony NEX-FS100 camcorder
(credit: Olaf Starorypinski)

"This business never stays in one place—just like the content," Schimmel said. "Trends change the way we communicate and the way we communicate changes the type of marketing I specifically am asked to produce and direct. Whatever my current project is, my goals are creating value, making it different, fulfilling the client's directives, remaining a creative leader in my field and stretching myself. For every project, I strive to remain contemporary, using cutting-edge technology to constantly reinvent myself. Thanks to new technology I can work faster and smarter with smaller lighting packages and more versatile, robust HD cameras."

"As I increasingly embraced digital technology, I shot with a variety of cameras and developed techniques to compensate for the depth-of-field issues I had with early HD," he said. "Over time it became clear that one camera company, Sony, was the best fit for my work and I began an in-depth study of the digital workflow."

Each of his recent projects – Wrangler and LVHN – had a range of unique requirements and challenges that the Sony NEX-FS100 camcorder proved more than able to handle.

"When Wrangler first described the campaign, I specifically thought about what a great opportunity it would be to shoot horses, livestock, cowboys, rodeo stars, and to work with rodeo stars," he said. "I immediately fell in love with the idea of creating spectacular shots on working ranches in the southwest. Once I arrived on location, it was easy to see the shots I wanted and where to place the camera. When LVHN approached me to produce, direct, and edit the initial launch for the ‘Find a Doctor' series, I thought about how to stay on schedule and shoot 15 doctor-interviews per day while still making a creative, authentic, visually compelling project."

Schimmel's preferred "look" often combines the holographic feel of oversaturated color composition that complements the directives, color-temperature related to content and the best lens for the story being told.

"The story influences what works best," he said. "That will get me there, it is not always about the biggest, most expensive, or most cutting-edge tools; it is about using the best tool for the job. Sony cameras have consistently proven to be the right solution to my production challenges, and these two projects were no exception."

On the Wrangler project, Schimmel and his team had trouble solving one scene: shooting high-speed roping and the high-speed shots of cattle drives. After running tests, he decided to use the NEX-FS100 camcorder for all high-speed shots. "The fluidity of the FS100 footage from these scenes is not-to-be-believed," he said.

For the "Find a Doctor" series, Schimmel was impressed by the camcorder's efficiency and quality as well as the camera's small size which is "less intimidating to non-actors," he said.

One constant in the majority of his work is the need for wide dynamic range and flexibility in all light conditions, including low light. "I love the FS100 specifically for its Exmor™ Super 35 CMOS sensor and the S35 chip," he said. "The camera helps to create a subtle and stunning ‘bokeh' effect which is very important to the look and feel I am always trying to achieve." The sensor also delivers outstanding exposure latitude for HD shooting. During the Wrangler project when I was shooting in the roping arena, there was no artificial light, only ambient light filtering through a trans-lucent roof covering. The camera's exposure latitude allowed me to shoot at 60 FPS in low light conditions. The end results were outstanding."

As a director who edits the majority of his own footage, Schimmel appreciates the Sony cameras most when he is color correcting. He does not usually work with a colorist in preproduction, preferring instead to do most correction in-camera and during the correction phase; "simply enhancing what already exists."

"During editing there is a vast advantage to correcting images shot with a Sony," he said. "I correct not only by eye, but also by taste and feel (guided by the scope) to obtain the right emotive content. The Sony cameras offer me simpler corrections within a greater creative range."

The Wrangler and LVHN images that were shot in very low light needed minimal color correction. "The correction was easy," he said. "Maintaining skin tones against the white lab coats of the doctors was an effortless fix. For the background, I was able to cool down the spill from the fluorescent lights. When I am correcting Sony footage compared to footage from other cameras, I find that Sony provides me with an image that offers me more color information."

A "Light Touch" A frame grab from one of Mark Schimmel's recent projects

Known for performance and sensitivity in available and low light, the NEX-FS100 camcorder proved up to the challenge. For Wrangler, the goal was authenticity, so very little artificial lighting was used. Schimmel planned shots around the natural light on location. For the LVHN series, he incorporated the overhead fluorescent lighting in the hallway without having to replace or gel every fixture.

"It was a challenge getting to the desired camera positions at the right time of day," he said. "The smaller footprint of the FS700 really helped to move the production along. I loved that instead of using a dolly and having to lay and level track, I could rent a Dana Dolly or slider and get similar results in-camera. Since fully embracing the digital realm, I have found a new passion for acquiring images. Digital technology and Sony cameras allow me to do more, shoot more, and offer more value to my clients."

"It all comes down to finding the right tool for the right job, and for these projects and just about everything else I work on, the Sony cameras are the right choice," he concluded. "I demand a lot from the cameras I choose because my technology is an extension of and inextricably connected to my own vision."

For more information about Mark Schimmel and his work, visit www.markschimmel.com and www.onceuponatimedigital.com

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