A breakthrough in cost performance, the Sony PMW-F3 starts at $16,000 MSRP. Here's a true Super 35mm image sensor designed from the ground up for moving pictures. So you'll get gorgeous images without gotchas like aliasing and more. The PL mount works directly with the 35mm cinema lenses you love. The on-board XDCAM EXTM recording takes advantage of Sony's well-established post workflow. The RGB output and S-LOG Gamma module, previously an option, is now standard equipment. With all the facilities of a true camcorder, the F3 is everything you expect. And beyond. Click here to read the Film and Digital Times Special Report.

To read case studies and the latest information about the camcorder download the new PMW-F3 brochure here.

A motion picture camera cannot entertain, enlighten or engage an audience until a cinematographer puts it to work. In this respect, the Sony PMW-F3 has been exceedingly fortunate. Brilliant artists have used the F3 to create beautiful pictures in a full range of productions. These include everything from theatrical features to concert videos, TV commercials, news, reality TV, natural history and corporate. Here are their stories in their own words.

SR-R1 SRMemory recorder

Combine the power of S-Log with 10 Bit 4:2:2 and RGB4:4:4 output from the PMW-F3 with the superb recording quality and features of the SR-R1 SRMemory recorder. read more

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SR-R1 SRMemory recorder

Combine the power of S-Log with 10 Bit 4:2:2 and RGB4:4:4 output from the PMW-F3 with the superb recording quality and features of the SR-R1 SRMemory recorder.

SR-R1

The SR-R1 recorder offers unmatched features and performance. At the heart of the R1 is the SR CODEC, an exceptional quality and very mild compression algorithm that is well established and widely used in feature films and many other productions. The SR CODEC is visually lossless, and offers picture quality unmatched by any other codec in use today. With the SR-R1, users also have the choice to record in Uncompressed DPX.

  • SRFile™ recording
    • SR-Lite (220Mbps)
    • SR-SQ (440Mbps)
    • SR-HQ (880Mbps)
  • Uncompressed DPX recording
  • HD-SDI/3G-SDI dual-link In/Out
    • 10-bit 4:2:2 or 10/12-bit RGB 4:4:4 recording
    • 4:2:2 1080 50p/60p recording
  • 3D stereoscopic (dual stream) recording:
    • 1080 30p 4:2:2 3D and 1080 30p RGB 4:4:4 3D
  • 16 channels uncompressed audio
  • Timecode In/Out
  • Remote Control Panel
  • RS-422 remote control

SRMemory cards

Transfer Speed (Sustained) SR-256S15: 1.5 Gbps
Capacity (User Capacity)* SR-256S15 (approx.. 225 GB)
Input Voltage 3.3 V DC ± 10%
Power Consumption Max. 10 W
Operating Temperature/Humidity Complies with the operating condition of the supported device
Storage Temperature/Humidity -40 °C to +80 °C (-40 °F to +176 °F)/95% or less (non condensation)
Dimensions 60 x 9.4 x 105 mm (2 3/8 x 3/8 x 4 1/4 inches) (excluding protrusions)
Mass Approx. 100 g (3.5 oz.)
Supplied Accessories Card case, Card label sheet, Operation manual

SR CODEC

Given the mild compression of the SR CODEC and the sophisticated algorithm being used the picture quality is exceptional and is the main reason why SR is long the mastering standard for on-set recording, delivery and archiving.

Highlights of the codec include the following:

  • The SR Codec algorithm offers both 10 bit and 12 bit in RGB
  • The SR codec has portions of every frame that are mathematically lossless
  • The SR Codec uses the efficiencies of DCT and lossless DPCM within each frame
  • Each frame is calculated independently based upon complexity of information
  • The SR Codec algorithm has pixel data tools for both lossy and lossless compression
  • SR Codec is a very mild compression algorithm and has significant advantages over uncompressed data given the payload, bandwidth, decoding power needed, RAID HDD arrays, etc.
  • Multi-generation robustness, up to seven generations have been tested with 220Mbps data rate with very little quality loss
  • Scaling, zooming into the picture frame does not noticeably reduce the quality of the image
  • Very easy decoding, fewer CPU resources and less HDD performance are required for decoding. Ideal for multi-track editing, finishing and laptop workflow
  • 220Mbps is 4:2:2 10 bit
  • 440Mbps up to 30P can be 4:2:2. The 440Mbps can also be 4:4:4 (SQ) RGB 10 bit
  • 880Mbps can be 4:2:2 up to 60P. The 880Mbps can also be 4:4:4 (HQ) RGB 10 bit up to 60P. This data rate can also support 12 bit, up to 30P
  • SR Codec algorithm is highly scalable, HD, 2K, and up to 4K (Four times 440Mbps)
  • Well-established postproduction system that's already a fixture in high-end facilities all over the world via the HDCAM SR™ tape format
  • Virtually lossless and visually lossless recording at 440 and 880 Mbps plus space-saving 220 Mbps SR Lite
  • Superb grayscale rendition with 10-bit and 12-bit recording
  • Immediate playback at full resolution lets you confirm that you got the shot before you strike the set
  • Broad file compatibility with popular editing and color correction systems, offering Direct to Edit and finishing workflows
  • Compatible with HDCAM SR tape for archiving and program exchange

Direct-to-edit NLE and finishing workflow

The combination of MXF file transfers and third-party support for the SR Codec translates into something wonderful: native SR Codec editing. Sony has been cooperating with nonlinear editing vendors to deliver on this promise.

  • Avid Media Composer 5.5 (and higher) and Symphony Nitris 5.5 (and higher). The Avid AMA plug-in decodes SRFiles, enabling you to edit and directly read the files. (Encoding/creating SRFiles is not currently supported.)
    Download the free SRPA-10 Avid AMA plug-ins for Mac OS® or Windows OS® here.
  • Final Cut Pro v7. The Final Cut Pro QT v7 plug-in decodes SRFiles, enabling you to edit and directly read the files. (Encoding/creating SRFiles is not currently supported.) The plug-in maps the MXF wrapper to the QuickTime environment so no re-wrapping or other conversion process is needed. This enables native, direct to edit access of the files in Final Cut Pro.
    Download the free SRPM-10 plug-in for Final Cut v7 here.
  • Sony Vegas® V10.d incorporates native, direct-to-edit workflow with the SR Codec.
  • Final Cut Pro X. No support at launch time. Sony is currently studying the development of a 64-bit plug in compatible with Final Cut Pro X.

FilmLight Baselight systems natively support SR Codec files in both hardware and software. For DI compositing and finishing, the SR Codec is natively supported by BlackMagic Design DaVinci Resolve.

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Super 35mm image sensor

Amazing low-light sensitivity. Gorgeous highlight handling. Able to see into dark areas without undue noise. The PMW-F3 responds to light and color beautifully, as directors of photography can attest. It's all made possible by an original Sony ExmorTM CMOS image sensor purpose-built for the PMW-F3. This is not some DSLR image sensor retrofitted for video. In fact, the F3 image sensor pixels are four times the size of typical DSLR pixels, equal to a two-stop advantage. It all adds up to one of the most eagerly anticipated cameras in Sony's history. read more

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Super 35mm image sensor

Amazing low-light sensitivity. Gorgeous highlight handling. Able to see into dark areas without undue noise. The PMW-F3 responds to light and color beautifully, as directors of photography can attest. It's all made possible by an original Sony ExmorTM CMOS image sensor purpose-built for the PMW-F3. This is not some DSLR image sensor retrofitted for video. In fact, the F3 image sensor pixels are four times the size of typical DSLR pixels, equal to a two-stop advantage. It all adds up to one of the most eagerly anticipated cameras in Sony's history.

Full Super 35mm image size

When it comes to image sensors, size definitely matters. Other things being equal, a bigger sensor equates to better low-light sensitivity and lower image noise. Even more important to some photographers is the pursuit of "bokeh," the defocused backgrounds made possible by shallow depth of field. A common technique for directing audience attention within the frame, shallow depth of field is far easier to achieve with a large sensor. And that's exactly what the PMW-F3 delivers, with a single sensor that closely approximates a Super 35mm film frame. Bigger sensors also make it easier to capture wide-angle shots; the field of view is wider for any given focal length lens.

The Micro Four ThirdsTM sensor (left) imposes a significant crop factor versus 35mm. The PMW-F3 sensor has nearly twice the surface area of the Micro Four Thirds sensor in 16:9 operation, making the F3 a significantly better match to the Super 35mm film frame.


Hold the three-CCD prism. The PMW-F3 features a single Super 35mm image sensor.

Not just a bigger sensor, bigger pixels

Low-light sensitivity and powerful highlight handling depend in part on the imager size and also on the size of the pixels on that imager. That's why Sony developed a new image sensor for the PMW-F3 with pixels that are four times the size of typical DSLR sensor pixels. Thanks to this two-stop advantage, the F3 achieves a sensitivity of F11 at a signal-to-noise ratio of 63 dB and an exposure index of ISO 800. Dynamic range extends to 460% of nominal peak white. All told, you'll capture images of incredible exposure latitude, whether you're seeing deep into the shadows at night or capturing the highlights in daytime exteriors.

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RGB output

From color grading to compositing and chroma key the most demanding Hollywood postproduction processes benefit from RGB recording. Once an option, the CBK-RGB01 RGB and S-LOG Gamma output module is now standard equipment. This enables the camcorder to output an image with spectacular resolution, color quality and bit depth: uncompressed 10-bit RGB 4:4:4 1080p, over industry-standard Dual-link HD-SDI. You'll be able to record this signal on the likes of Sony's SRW-1 HDCAM SRTM recorder and the SR-R1 SRMasterTM recorder, either of which is capable of visually lossless 880 Megabits per second image capture. Simultaneous recording means you can capture to the XDCAM EXTM and HDCAM SR recorders in perfect sync, for simultaneous online and offline versions of your production.read more

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RGB output

From color grading to compositing and chroma key the most demanding Hollywood postproduction processes benefit from RGB recording. Once an option, the CBK-RGB01 RGB and S-LOG Gamma output module is now standard equipment. This enables the camcorder to output an image with spectacular resolution, color quality and bit depth: uncompressed 10-bit RGB 4:4:4 1080p, over industry-standard Dual-link HD-SDI. You'll be able to record this signal on the likes of Sony's SRW-1 HDCAM SRTM recorder and the SR-R1 SRMasterTM recorder, either of which is capable of visually lossless 880 Megabits per second image capture. Simultaneous recording means you can capture to the XDCAM EXTM and HDCAM SR recordings in perfect sync, for simultaneous online and offline versions of your production.


Pure file-based 4:4:4 workflow with the SRW-1 HDCAM SR recorder and the CBK-RGB01 RGB and S-LOG Gamma upgrade.

Direct to edit

Right out of the box, the XDCAM EXTM system offers a mature workflow. In the edit bay, the XDCAM EX codec enables direct-to-edit operation with leading NLEs from Sony, Avid, Apple, Adobe and Edius. Final Cut Pro® users can take advantage of Sony's affordable cinémon® plug-in for native, direct-to-edit operation—no need to rewrap files. The modest bitrate of XDCAM EX recording also enables fast, easy file transfers over data networks and affordable storage on hard disk arrays. And instead of burdening your production with data wrangling and backup headaches, Sony provides robust, reliable solutions.

It's never been easier to go from shoot to edit.

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S-LOG Gamma

For even greater recording capability, Sony includes an RGB and S-LOG Gamma output option, called the CBK-RGB01. S-LOG Gamma represents unique encoding, carefully tailored to the capabilities of the PDW-F3 image sensor. S-LOG Gamma mimics the tonal response of a film negative, so you retain full flexibility in color correction and a seamless workflow with postproduction facilities geared toward Cineon® files, DPX files and other LOG encoded material. read more

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S-LOG Gamma

For even greater recording capability, Sony includes the RGB and S-LOG Gamma output module, called the CBK-RGB01.
S-LOG Gamma represents unique encoding, carefully tailored to the capabilities of the PDW-F3 image sensor. S-LOG Gamma mimics the tonal response of a film negative, so you retain full flexibility in color correction and a seamless workflow with postproduction facilities geared toward Cineon® files, DPX files and other LOG encoded material.







With S-LOG Gamma encoding engaged, performance of the camera shifts to 800% dynamic range, at F16 sensitivity, 57 dB signal-to-noise ratio, exposure index 1600.


Be the master of incredible dynamic range. Capture up to 800% of nominal peak white using Sony's S-LOG Gamma upgrade.

S-Log original picture, highlight and shadow detail is perfectly preserved but the picture looks flat, de-saturated. Notice the highlight detail in the tree.

S-Log picture color corrected for REC-709 video monitor, example. With S-Log + Color Correction + Video LUT, highlight detail is saved and shadows, mid-tones also look good without additional work. Notice the highlight detail in the tree is preserved. By using a Cineon LUT even more detail can be preserved in the final grade.

To integrate S-LOG Gamma into highly efficient color correction and editing workflows, FilmLight™ offers the Truelight™ plug-in for Adobe® After Effects®, Adobe Photoshop®, The Foundry™ Nuke™, Apple® Shake® and Eyeon™ Digital Fusion™ systems. The plug-in converts the S-LOG color space on the fly into conventional Rec.709 video, color corrected Rec.709, film print emulation and more.

For technical information on how to optimize images in the
S-LOG Gamma workflow and how to interface with Cineon files, DPX files and the ASC Color Decision List (CDL), we invite you to consult our S-LOG Gamma White Paper.

The Truelight plug-in from FilmLight™ converts S-LOG gamma footage on the fly.

S-LOG Gamma enables you to capture images that go way over 100% of the image sensor's nominal peak white and still protect against harsh highlight clipping.

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LUT Support

Without the correct processing, Sony's S-LOG Gamma appears "flat," missing deep blacks or piercing highlights. While many DPs are accustomed to looking at such LOG encoded images, many producers and clients are not. For this reason, Sony Look-up-Tables (LUTs) convert S-LOG Gamma to conventional Rec. 709 video for real-time monitoring on the set and for offline recording onto SxS memory cards. With the included CBK-RGB01 RGB and S-LOG output option, you get four viewing LUTs. read more

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LUT Support

Without the correct processing, Sony's S-LOG Gamma appears "flat," missing deep blacks or piercing highlights. While many DPs are accustomed to looking at such LOG encoded images, many producers and clients are not. For this reason, Sony Look-up-Tables (LUTs) convert S-LOG Gamma to conventional Rec. 709 video for real-time monitoring on the set and for offline recording onto SxS memory cards. With the included CBK-RGB01 RGB and S-LOG output option, you get four viewing LUTs.


LUT support enables you to have it both ways: S-LOG Gamma output for super-quality outboard recording, plus Rec.709 output
for on-set monitoring and on-board recording.

For example, the S-LOG to R709 conversion LUT delivers converted images to the HD-SDI output, for monitoring in the field. You can also "bake in" the LUT to images recorded on SxS cards, suitable for making EDL/ALE off-line files. At the same time, you can record S-LOG encoded RGB output onto HDCAM SRTM tapes and use these as on-line material. By using both HDCAM SR tapes and SxS cards, the PMW-F3 enables efficient post-production workflow.

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Exmor CMOS technology

Sony is a world leader in semiconductor image sensors and a leader in the fundamentals of CMOS technology. We sought to minimize the "rolling shutter" artifact common among CMOS sensors by speeding up the readout process. Conventional sensors use only a handful of digital-to-analog converters, creating a traffic jam that slows down the readout process. Sony's ExmorTM CMOS design supplies each column of pixels with its own, dedicated converter. The sensor has literally hundreds of converters, reducing rolling shutter to a minimum. read more

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Exmor CMOS technology

Sony is a world leader in semiconductor image sensors and a leader in the fundamentals of CMOS technology. We sought to minimize the "rolling shutter" artifact common among CMOS sensors by speeding up the readout process. Conventional sensors use only a handful of digital-to-analog converters, creating a traffic jam that slows down the readout process. Sony's ExmorTM CMOS design supplies each column of pixels with its own, dedicated converter. The sensor has literally hundreds of converters, reducing rolling shutter to a minimum.

1080/60p high-speed shooting

The Exmor sensor design also supports 1080/60p high-speed shooting, a capability that actually outstrips the on-board recorder but will work with compatible outboard recorders via Dual-Link HD-SDI output. Even at high data rates, the sensor is extraordinarily kind to your battery pack. Power consumption is a remarkably low 24 watts.

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35mm PL lens mount

From Cooke to Angenieux to Fujinon to Zeiss, 35mm motion picture lenses inspire critical appreciation and passion among the professionals who use them. An entire culture of movie production has arisen to support the creative potential and operational requirements of these lenses. Not only does Sony provide the PMW-F3 with an industry-standard PL mount to accept these lenses, we also incorporate an image sensor that approximates the Super 35mm motion picture film frame. This means no 24% crop factor to introduce unwanted telephoto conversion. This means no scrambling for wider apertures to achieve shallow depth of field. All the familiar lenses behave in all the familiar ways, to achieve predictable, comfortable
results. read more

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35mm PL lens mount

From Cooke to Angenieux to Fujinon to Zeiss, 35mm motion picture lenses inspire critical appreciation and passion among the professionals who use them. An entire culture of movie production has arisen to support the creative potential and operational requirements of these lenses. Not only does Sony provide the PMW-F3 with an industry-standard PL mount to accept these lenses, we also incorporate an image sensor that approximates the Super 35mm film frame. This means no 24% crop factor to introduce unwanted telephoto conversion. This means no scrambling for wider apertures to achieve shallow depth of field. All the familiar lenses behave in all the familiar ways, to achieve predictable, comfortable results.

Hot shoe for Cooke/i and ARRI LDS lens systems

Some of the latest cinema lenses include a hot shoe for intelligent lens-to-camera communication. The PMW-F3 lens mount supports this with electronic contacts for the Cooke/i and ARRI LDS lens interfaces.

Original Sony F3 lens mount

Remove the supplied PL lens adaptor and the camera offers its own, native F3 lens mount. The Sony F3 mount supports Sony’s SCL-Z18X140 14x zoom, which brings the convenience of auto focus, auto iris, image stabilization and servo zoom to Super 35 cinematography.

New Sony PL Mount Lenses

While the PMW-F3L is offered as a body only, the PMW-F3K includes three Sony PL mount prime lenses. Compact and lightweight, the lenses form a perfect complement to the handheld camcorder. All three have consistent operation, including a common location for the follow focus gear. The set includes a 35mm T2.0, 50 mm T2.0 and 80mm T2.0. An attractive option is the Sony 11-16mm T3.0 1.5x wide zoom, the SCL-P11X15.

The hot shoe contacts are for Cooke/i lenses (at the 12 o'clock position) and ARRI LDS lenses (at 3 o'clock).

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On-board XDCAM EXTM recording

From the very outset, Sony understood that professional camcorders are only the beginning of a workflow that can include significant post production. That's why Sony camcorders are designed to work with a robust production "platform" that includes convenient recording media, compatible studio decks, direct-to-edit operation with major nonlinear editors and more. The PMW-F3 is no exception. By including XDCAM EX recording and two slots for solid-state SxS® memory cards, the F3 offers a proven, versatile workflow solution right out of the box. read more

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On-board XDCAM EXTM recording

From the very outset, Sony understood that professional camcorders are only the beginning of a workflow that can include significant post production. That's why Sony camcorders are designed to work with a robust production "platform" that includes convenient recording media, compatible studio decks, direct-to-edit operation with major nonlinear editors and more. The PMW-F3 is no exception. By including XDCAM EX recording and two slots for solid-state SxS® memory cards, the F3 offers a proven, versatile workflow solution right out of the box.

It's not just a camcorder, it's the gateway to a complete XDCAM EX production platform.

High recording quality

XDCAM EX recording delivers the glories of full-resolution 1920x1080 progressive scan imagery. For vivid detail, brilliant color and lifelike motion, Sony's XDCAM EXTM system records 4:2:0 signals at a choice of 25 or 35 Megabits per second. Your images are securely stored on compact, lightweight SxS flash media (sold separately). The 35 Mbps data rate captures full HD with long loads, up to 200 minutes on a single 64 GB card. Two slots enable over six hours of continuous recording without changing cards. The system uses the robust MPEG-2 Long GOP codec, with a highly sophisticated content-aware encoding engine.


XDCAM EX recording is easy to handle in every respect, from the solid-state SxS memory cards to the network-friendly data rates to the NLE-friendly codec.

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Slow & Quick Motion

Film cameras enable the director of photography to vary the frame rate: overcranking for dramatic slow motion to emphasize a crucial scene or undercranking for an often-humorous fast motion effect. Sony's Slow & Quick Motion delivers this capability for native 24p projects.

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Slow & Quick Motion

Film cameras enable the director of photography to vary the frame rate: overcranking for dramatic slow motion to emphasize a crucial scene or undercranking for an often-humorous fast motion effect. Sony's Slow & Quick Motion delivers this capability for native 24p projects.

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Uncompressed 10-bit HD-SDI 4:2:2 output

For critical applications that demand even higher recording quality, you can connect the uncompressed 10-bit HD-SDI 4:2:2 output and enjoy simultaneous recording onto external decks. Thanks to Dual-Link HD-SDI, you can even record frame rates up to 1080/60p on compatible external recorders such as Sony's SRW-1 HDCAM SRTM recorder. Other outboard options include the Convergent Design nanoFlashTM and Gemini 4:4:4TM recorders. Based on the hardware codec that Sony builds into XDCAM HDTM products, the nanoFlash recorder empowers you with superlative 4:2:2 recording at up to 280 Megabits per second. Simultaneous recording means you can capture to onboard XDCAM EX and outboard recorders in perfect sync. read more

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Uncompressed 10-bit HD-SDI 4:2:2 output

For critical applications that demand even higher recording quality, you can connect the uncompressed 10-bit HD-SDI 4:2:2 output and enjoy simultaneous recording onto external decks. Thanks to Dual-Link HD-SDI, you can even record frame rates up to 1080/60p on compatible external recorders such as Sony's SRW-1 HDCAM SRTM recorder. Other outboard options include the Convergent Design nanoFlashTM and Gemini 4:4:4TM recorders. Based on the hardware codec that Sony builds into XDCAM HDTM products, the nanoFlash recorder empowers you with superlative 4:2:2 recording at up to 280 Megabits per second. Simultaneous recording means you can capture to onboard XDCAM EX and outboard recorders in perfect sync.

Good, better, best. The PMW-F3 will support a phenomenal range of recording systems—and a complete range of requirements from student productions to the most demanding Hollywood features.

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Output up to 1080/60p

The image sensor of the PMW-F3 is capable of full-resolution 1080/60p image capture, even though the on-board recorder can't handle that avalanche of data. That's why Sony provides Dual-Link HD-SDI output. This enables two coax cables to convey 1080/60p to a compatible outboard recorder, such as the SRW-1 HDCAM SRTM recorder or the SR-R1 SRMasterTM recorder. Both recorders will enable high-speed capture for dramatic, full-resolution overcranking effects.

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Output up to 1080/60p

The image sensor of the PMW-F3 is capable of full-resolution 1080/60p image capture, even though the on-board recorder can't handle that avalanche of data. That's why Sony provides Dual-Link HD-SDI output. This enables two coax cables to convey 1080/60p to a compatible outboard recorder, such as the Sony SRW-1 HDCAM SRTM recorder or the SR-R1 SRMasterTM recorder. Both recorders will enable high-speed capture for dramatic, full-resolution overcranking effects.

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Dennis Dillon: “60 Minutes”

"The Super 35 sensor really makes network news anchors punch out from the background."
  —Dennis Dillon, freelance DP for "60 Minutes" and "48 Hours"   read more

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Dennis Dillon: “60 Minutes”

"The Super 35 sensor really makes network news anchors punch out from the background."
  —Dennis Dillon, freelance DP for "60 Minutes" and "48 Hours"

"My clients come from a 2/3-inch broadcast camera background. But the pictures out of the F3 are really opening people's eyes. Having a Super 35 sensor enables us to completely change our approach to shooting field interviews, where we've got to work in the room we're given. With 2/3-inch, I'd always be fighting the background, fussing with lights to create the least distracting, most flattering shot. With the F3, the background simply blurs out. It's the first time many of the anchors have seen themselves punch out from the background like this. They love the look. In fact, Scott Pelley of ‘60 Minutes' doesn't want to work with any other camera. He suggested that I bring the F3 into the studio. I reminded him that his expensive set has been designed with 2/3-inch cameras in mind."

"I compare the F3 to Neapolitan ice cream: chocolate, strawberry and vanilla all in one. It's easy to light, gives you beautiful depth of field and incredible exposure latitude. I shot a time lapse of Westminster Abbey for the Royal Wedding and the way the F3 held the exterior day contrast blew my clients away. It really pulls detail out of the shadows."

"I also find myself using half the key light I'd need with a smaller imager. And the F3 sensor is so quiet, I think nothing of using 12 dB gain. In fact, I shot a pre-dawn scene for a ‘60 Minutes' piece on homeless families. The show typically runs a shot for three seconds. This picture was so beautiful, they let it run for eleven seconds."

Dennis Dillon
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Alister Chapman: Duran Duran

"Pairing up the F3 with ARRI Alura and Optimo lenses, the images were jaw dropping."
  —Alister Chapman, Duran Duran "A Diamond in the Mind" available on DVD and Blu-ray Disc   read more

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Alister Chapman: Duran Duran

"Pairing up the F3 with ARRI Alura and Optimo lenses, the images were jaw dropping."
  —Alister Chapman, Duran Duran "A Diamond in the Mind" available on DVD and Blu-ray Disc

"I get a call from Den Lennie and James Gavin of Hangman Studios. Did I think we could shoot a Duran Duran concert with just 7 days to prepare? Of course I said yes. So James and Den got together with Director Gavin Elder who has been working with Duran Duran since 2003 and the magic started to happen."

"Shooting a concert with Super 35mm is a challenge. It's not as easy as traditional broadcast, not in any way. But when you start pairing up 12 PMW-F3s with 1000mm, yes 1 meter, lenses, beautiful ARRI Alura 18-80mm and Optimo 24-290mm lenses, shooting an incredibly dynamic light show at a massive sell-out arena concert, I think you can see why this project was so exciting!"

"My role: camera setup, creating a custom picture profile, helping on lens and kit choices, on-site tech support and then operating one of the two PMW-F3s using the MTF B4-to-S35 adaptors that I designed along with a Canon 10 to 400mm zoom. When you add the 2.5x magnification factor of the adaptor, that equates to a 25mm to 1000mm zoom. My role was to shoot the close ups of lead singer Simon Le Bon from the Front of House area, 160 feet from the stage. With such a long lens the Depth of Field was tiny and the shoot was hard work, but incredibly rewarding."

"The end result was an electrifying atmosphere and from what I've seen so far, jaw dropping images. This is one of those projects I'll remember for a long, long time."

Alister Chapman
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Ed David: TV commercials

"S-Log has saved our butts more times than I can say."
  —Ed David, DP for TV commercials, branded entertainment and documentaries   read more

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Ed David: TV commercials

"S-Log has saved our butts more times than I can say."
  —Ed David, DP for TV commercials, branded entertainment and documentaries

"With the Sony F3 and S-Log, we can walk into a visually gross shooting environment and still come away with great pictures. On more than one project, the F3 was B camera to a far more expensive camera. It's the ultimate B camera in this context. To many people's eyes it holds up so well. And the F3 is just a fraction of the price."

"We had one doc-style shoot in a convention center with a disgusting pattern of old-school fluorescents. It was hideous. But S-Log was a lifesaver. It gave us so much latitude in post that the color became soft and quite beautiful."

"I had an interview shoot for the History Channel in the sun room of the subject's house. I only used a Joker 800 and bounced it on him. After bringing him up in post, his face was great and the outside was perfectly exposed."

"The combination of S-Log and the camera's color matrix controls also enables me to nail skin tones. The result is very organic and flattering. In fact, S-Log continues to give me happy surprises. Shots that maybe looked okay on the day end up looking fantastic in post. It's such a benefit to have that much image fidelity and latitude to work with."

Ed David
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Charles Papert: “Key and Peele”

"S-Log came through brilliantly."
  —Charles Papert, DP, "Key and Peele"   read more

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Charles Papert: “Key and Peele”

"S-Log came through brilliantly."
  —Charles Papert, DP, "Key and Peele"

"We just wrapped Season 1 for the new Comedy Central sketch series ‘Key and Peele.' The sketches are essentially mini-movies, each with a unique look and as much production value as we can give them. From my first conversation with the director it was apparent that we needed a camera with an S35 sized sensor and filmic quality. But the budget dictated that we move fast, always on location and with a limited crew for a network series. I was able to keep the lighting package modest for interiors and night exteriors, thanks to the incredible sensitivity and low noise of the F3."

"I also had to tackle a variety of day exteriors without the luxury of picking the perfect time of day or implementing serious grip artillery, so we absolutely had to capture maximum dynamic range. S-Log encoding came through brilliantly. We were able to tame the savage contrast, push and pull the footage extensively in post to create a multitude of looks and the resulting images were beautiful (if I may say so)!"

"I received many compliments from the executive producers and the network on the visual quality of the show, especially given the humble circumstances. I consider the F3 to have been a major ally."

Charles Papert
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Alin Bijan: “Ghost of Goodnight Lane”

"Recording 10-bit uncompressed S-Log, the results were phenomenal."
  —Alin Bijan, Producer, "The Ghost of Goodnight Lane"   read more

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Alin Bijan: “Ghost of Goodnight Lane”

"Recording 10-bit uncompressed S-Log, the results were phenomenal."
  —Alin Bijan, Producer, "The Ghost of Goodnight Lane"

"In putting together our feature film, 'The Ghost of Goodnight Lane,' we were really asking for the moon. While my creative side wants the best possible pictures, we also needed a super-efficient post pipeline to make the most of our budget. For this project, the Canon 5D wasn't enough of a camera. I've used the RED camera once before, but I couldn't afford the time and cost of file conversions in post. Combining the F3 with the Cinedeck™ EX recorder worked beautifully."

"One key to the F3 is S-Log gamma, which retains absolutely everything the camera sees. When you switch to S-Log, the difference is phenomenal. It's like a whole other camera. For VFX, we could record uncompressed, 10-bit, 4:4:4. To save space, we captured the rest of the show in Apple ProRes, and to tell the truth, it comes awfully close to uncompressed. Shooting in ProRes means you can go straight from the camera to the timeline. There are no conversions, no rewrapping, no nothing. You're editing immediately."

"The F3 is fast and flexible, helping us to complete shooting in 22 days. It's easy to strip down for tight spaces, like our shower scene. And it's amazingly sensitive. We got plenty of shots with just practical lights. At ISO 800 the picture was beautiful—and still looking good at ISO 1200."

Alin Bijan
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Michael Barrett: “Battle of the Year: The Dream Team”

"When you see the incredible dancing combined with 3D, it's astounding."
  —Michael Barrett, DP, 3D feature "Battle of the Year: The Dream Team"   read more

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Michael Barrett: “Battle of the Year: The Dream Team”

"When you see the incredible dancing combined with 3D, it's astounding."
  —Michael Barrett, DP, 3D feature "Battle of the Year: The Dream Team"

"We will have thirty-five days to do this movie. The script is 132 pages and we are going to need about 40 setups a day. Our cast consists primarily of b-boy dancers who have never acted before. There will be almost no prep time with the cameras because they ship to France. And, oh yeah, it's going to be 3D. What could possibly go wrong?"

"I was really surprised. I think the only downtime we had was our first day while we were still learning the system. After the second day, everything just went so smoothly. This was my fourth 3D film. Every other 3D experience you hear stories and I could tell you: ‘this went wrong, that went wrong.' It wasn't like we had fewer of those problems. We didn't have any of them. Your main goal as a filmmaker is to tell a story, to convey emotion, to be true to those elements. The less attention you can pay to the technical aspects, the more you can focus on the storytelling. It certainly helps when you can rely on your cameras and equipment."

"We had six Sony F3s on 3ality™ TS-35 rigs, mostly on dollies, sometimes on Steadicam®. We had a few Sony TD300 camcorders for extra mobility. With the exception of the dance sequences, the 3D experience in ‘Battle of the Year' will not be about gimmicks and gags so much as being more in that reality. In the climactic Battle, these guys are doing incredible feats with their bodies that you can't imagine are physically possible. With the music and the tremendous energy of the crowd combined with the 3D, it's pretty astounding."

Michael Barrett
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Zach Zamboni: “No Reservations”

"A full set of cinematic tools and great sensitivity."
  —Zach Zamboni, DP, "Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations" and "The Layover"   read more

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Zach Zamboni: “No Reservations”

"A full set of cinematic tools and great sensitivity."
  —Zach Zamboni, DP, "Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations" and "The Layover"

"'No Reservations' has progressed from Panasonic DVX100s and Sony 2000 DV cameras to HVX200, Sony Z7U, and then Sony EX1s and EX3s with Canon 7D and 1D mixed in. With the Sony F3, I feel the shows are finally looking the way we always intended, entirely in digital 35 mm. Travel is supposed to be cinematic. In the F3 we have affordable Super 35 in a camera I can truly work on my shoulder and has all the functionality of professional video. We have access to great PL lenses coupled with terrific sensitivity and low noise. SxS integrates into our existing workflow."

"The sensitivity of the F3 is terrific. On 'No Reservations' we find ourselves in every sort of scenario, and often unexpected ones. Sensitivity is very important in situations where you don't have a lot of time or control, or where you want to tread lightly. Bourdain often has dinner in the homes of ordinary families, people who have never been in front of the camera. Intensive lighting can be intimidating for them. The F3's sensitivity allows us a smaller lighting footprint, which helps our hosts relax and feel a bit less like there's a camera crew at the dinner table."

"We record native XDCAM EX 4:2:0 onto Sony SxS cards. To eliminate data wrangling in the field, we always travel with enough cards for the whole show—at least 70 hours. The EX stuff is very dependable. We've shot in 120 degree heat in Iraq, 99% humidity in Singapore, beaches, boats, and the snow—places where other cameras would certainly shut down. We've never lost a single frame. Post is very happy with the SxS card workflow."

Zach Zamboni
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Douglas Wellman: USC

"The most popular camera we've ever had."
  —Douglas Wellman, Assistant Dean, USC School of Cinematic Arts   read more

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Douglas Wellman: USC

"The most popular camera we've ever had."
  —Douglas Wellman, Assistant Dean, USC School of Cinematic Arts

"I've been here long enough to remember when digital was a sign of Satan. We had a program where students learned the fundamentals on 8mm, then moved up to 16 and 35. But we've been all-digital for years now. Until recently, the F900 was our top camera. Now it's the F3."

"Everybody loves this camera. The quality of the image is absolutely marvelous. I remember going to a thesis shoot and looking at the monitor. The scene was in a basement: all grays and deep shadows. But with the F3, the DP captured it all."

"The F3 is so sensitive you don't need to take the whole studio out with you. For thesis films, students have the opportunity to rent high-end 35mm and HD camera packages, but most of them come with multiple boxes of accessories. With the Sony F3, it's just two or three. The F3 gives us the flexibility of interchangeable lenses, the teaching advantages of full manual operation, Super 35 depth of field and tremendous latitude with S-Log. The F3 must be the most popular camera we've ever had. I can't keep them on the shelf."

Douglas Wellman



Director of photography David Aristizabal (left), director Tyrell Lloyd (center) and sound recorder Mark Manallo (rear) on the set at USC, with Sony F3s on a 3D FilmFactory rig.

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Matthew Cherry: “The Last Fall”

"The F3 is a game-changer. It really levels the playing field."
  —Matthew Cherry, Director, "The Last Fall"   read more

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Matthew Cherry: “The Last Fall”

"The F3 is a game-changer. It really levels the playing field."
  —Matthew Cherry, Director, "The Last Fall"

"I entered the NFL as an undrafted free agent and was out after three years. It turns out that's the average pro football career. After moving over to film production and directing some music videos, I wanted to make a movie about my NFL experience. But I didn't have studio backing. I reached into my own pocket, did some online crowdfunding and eventually got the support of another ex-player. That's how ‘The Last Fall' came to be."

"I wanted it to look like any other movie you'd see on a Friday night. But I didn't have a studio budget. The project never would have happened without the Sony F3. It's a game-changer, a camera that really levels the playing field. Now you don't need a million dollars to make your movie."

"We had a two ton package—small enough to fit in the van. There were three people on the camera crew, plus three on lighting and grip. Over the course of 15 days, we shot motion control, time lapse, techno crane, handheld, in cars, you name it. The size and weight of the F3 really helped us make our days. For the entire shoot we had no camera issues. None."

"At initial screenings, people have been amazed. And we're on our way. ‘The Last Fall' premiered last month at SXSW and we're in negotiations for distribution."

Matthew Cherry
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