Archive & Content Management

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ODSD280F

ODSD280F

Optical Disc Archive fiber channel drive unit for the ODS-L30M/L60E/L100E PetaSite scalable li...

U.S. List Price

ODSD280U

ODSD280U

Optical Disc Archive stand-alone drive with very high transfer speeds of 1 Gbps write (verify ...

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PWS100TD1

PWS100TD1

Tape Digitizing Station

U.S. List Price

ODSD77U

ODSD77U

Optical Disc Archive External USB3.0 Drive

U.S. List Price

ODSL30M

ODSL30M

PetaSite Optical Disc Archive 30-Slot Library Master Unit

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ODSL60E

ODSL60E

Petasite Library Drive Expansion Unit

U.S. List Price

ODSL100E

ODSL100E

Petasite Library Expansion Unit

U.S. List Price

ODSD77F

ODSD77F

PetaSite Library Drive Unit

U.S. List Price

  • Showing 1-8 of 8 results

Easy and Efficient Archive Management

As information technology continues to progress, companies in every industry are working with ever-growing quantities of digital data. Sony's Optical Disc Archive system has been developed to help these organizations achieve safe, long-term storage of video, photos, text, and other important digital assets.

Optical Disc Archive leverages the technologies and reliability of optical discs originally developed for commercial broadcast equipment. The system can store important data safely for up to 50 years. It also succeeds in keeping down total archiving costs, and has a very low environmental footprint. The system is easily scalable: users can begin with a small archive stored on a few shelves, and expand into a large library as data accumulates.

Enhanced situational awareness

Sony's archiving solution offers reliable and economical long-term storage suitable for broadcast stations, educational institutions, federal and local government agencies, banks, and many others.

Optical Disc Archive delivers key advantages over other forms of video and data archiving, making it ideal for all your long-term and near-online archiving needs.

 

Reliability

Sony's Optical Disc Archive represents the coalescence of optical technologies developed by Sony over a span of more than 30 years and offers media for the long-term reliable storage of customers' valuable data.

 

Up to 50+ Years of Archival Life

The Optical Disc Archive system stores data onto cartridge-encased optical discs. Each cartridge holds 12 discs, enabling high-capacity storage. Because optical disc writes and reads are non-contact, they offer extremely reliable and long-lasting storage. The cartridge, in turn, is durable and dust-resistant, and can be expected to keep data safe for up to 50 years.

When the recording surface material is heated above the melting point of 1112°F and then rapidly cooled after melting, its substances solidify in an amorphous state. Unlike data tape, the Optical Disc Archive system doesn't need media migration to copy all data onto the latest media. The system's drive software treats each 12-disc cartridge as a single volume, while the drive itself incorporates a small changer mechanism that automatically changes the discs so that users don't recognize they are using multiple discs. Six media types are available, with cartridge capacities ranging from 300 GB (at the low end) to 1.5 TB (high end), so users are can choose the capacity that best meets their application.

Up to 50+ Years of Archival Life
 
Recording Mechanism - Phase-change Technology

Recording Mechanism - Phase-Change Technology

To realize long-term storage, Optical Disc Archive writes data using a system known as "Phase Change." When the recording surface material is heated above the melting point (1112° F) and then rapidly cooled after melting by optical laser beam, individual elements change to an "amorphous" state from its original "crystal" state. ("Amorphous" is the state where the individual elements are positioned randomly). In addition, the data recording layer is safely covered by a separate film to help minimize the effects of external contaminants such as dust or water.

The adoption of this recording system in the Optical Disc Archive results in truly outstanding long-term storage performance compared to methods such as recording on magnetic tape and hard disc that record electrical signals directly onto a contact surface.

Quality Assurance

To ensure that customers can store important data for extended periods of time with peace of mind, Sony is endlessly engaged in verification of the reliability of media from every conceivable angle. The results of four typical undertakings to this end are presented below.

This is a preliminary calculation based on objective data and Sony offers no guarantee that media are capable of storing data for 50 years irrespective of the environment.

 

Acceleration Tests - Temperature and Humidity

To demonstrate long life spanning many tens of years, Sony performs acceleration tests defined in ISO standards. Media are left in extremely harsh environments (maximum temperature and humidity of 176°F and 85%) for extended periods of time and the degree of degradation measured (actually, the error rate is measured) and, from this, preliminary calculation of the lifespan of media in ordinary environments is performed.

Looking at the results in the figure to the right, we can see that, when data is stored in an environment with an ideal temperature of 73°F (23°C), durability is ample at well over 50 years. Verifications such as this demonstrate that media possess excellent long-term storage performance in ordinary environments and, in addition, the high resilience needed to cope, for example, with a wide range of climates around the world and temporary environmental changes during transportation. When tape media is exposed to high temperatures such as this, the tape itself stretches, resulting in the strong possibility of damage to data.

Accelleration Tests - Temperature and Humidity

This is a preliminary calculation based on objective data and Sony offers no guarantee that media are capable of storing data for 50 years irrespective of the environment.

 

Acceleration Tests - Corrosive Gas

Sony performed another acceleration test in order to prove there will be no corrosion under normal environment. This aging is based on the corrosive environmental test conditions specified by the IEC (International Electro‐technical Commission) Method‐4. As a result, media quality degradation was practically nothing after leaving the media in corrosive gas for 2 weeks.

 
 

Sea Water Tests - Water Resistant Media

Over the last few years, several natural disasters have occurred in which seawater from tsunamis, flooding and hurricanes have presented the greatest risk of the loss of data. Optical Disc Archive is an ideal means of protecting customers' data from such water damage. To verify this, at Sony, the media was left submerged in seawater for 3 weeks and, after completely removing the seawater and drying the media, it was confirmed that data could be read without any problems. Once water penetrates a hard disc, damage to all data on the disc is unavoidable. Water and salt can cause degradation of the tape surface of tape media, presenting an extremely high risk of data loss. Third parties have also conducted tests on XDCAM® media, which uses Sony's same optical disc technologies, and tested them in snow and dishwashers.

 
Saltwater Test
 
Abrasion Tests - Scratch-Resistant Media

Abrasion Tests - Scratch-Resistant Media

When using conventional optical media such as CDs, DVDs or Blu-ray® Discs, no doubt everyone has had experience of handling such media carefully to avoid scratching the surface. This is because repeated scratching of the surface results in destabilization of data when read by the laser. On the other hand, each disc used by the Optical Disc Archive system is protected with a robust coating film, making them virtually resistant to scratching even if exposed to abrasion. The figure to the right shows abrasion testing conducted at Sony, and shows that, although conventional DVDs are scratched, discs used by the Optical Disc Archive system have virtually no scratches at all.

 

During ordinary use, the discs do not protrude outside of the cartridge.

During ordinary use, the discs do not protrude outside of the cartridge.
 
Discs are partitioned inside the cartridge to ensure that they never come into contact with each other.

Discs are partitioned inside the cartridge to ensure that they never come into contact with each other.

 

Prevention of Data Falsification - True Worm Media

Storing data over a long period of time presents a significant risk that the stored data may be changed with malicious intent by third parties. The rewriting of data such as video footage that represents national assets or personal data such as medical information must be avoided at all costs. This is why media in general use is provided with a mechanism that makes rewriting impossible once data has been written. Although tape media too is provided with a recording inhibit switch to prevent rewriting, it is impossible to completely prevent third parties with malicious intent from tampering with the data. With Optical Disc Archive media, on the other hand, data falsification can be virtually prevented by its actual write characteristics. Of the two Optical Disc Archive media, the characteristics of "Write Once Media" make it impossible to rewrite data from the outside. In this way, Optical Disc Archive offers long-term protection of customers' data as "True WORM (Write Once Read Many)" media.

 

Confidential Data Read - Low Error Rate

Optical Disc Archive media boasts a range of software-based error correcting technologies which, when combined with its proven robust hardware, give it an unsurpassed high data-read quality.

 

On the Fly Verify (Drive)

When data is written to Optical Disc Archive media, written data is read internally using a drive and driver developed by Sony, and the read quality is checked according to strict unique standards formulated by Sony to ensure that data can be read without fail even after long-term storage.

On the Fly Verify (Drive)

Complete data comparison using multiple optical eyes!

 
Optical Disc Archive Parity (File System Driver)

Proprietary parity mechanism by file system driver, on top of standard ECC (error check and correction).

Optical Disc Archive Parity (File System Driver)

In addition to using the basic optical disc Error Check and Correction (ECC) technology also employed by Blu-Ray®, Optical Disc Archive delivers an unrivalled error rate by allocating parity (Technology that protects data in the event of an error through data redundancy) for each fixed size in individual file system layers.

 

Hash Value Check (Application)

Using an application that was originally developed by Sony - in addition, the Content Manager and File Manager perform hash-value comparison of the original data with data written with Optical Disc Archive technology. (Hash Value Check is a general technology and its mechanism is used in many applications.)

On the Fly Verify (Drive)

Calculate Hash value and compare

 

Error Rate

"Error Rate" refers to measurement of the data read quality of media and the lower the value, the higher the data read quality. Calculations based on a general error rate of media such as hard discs and tape media of 10-17 translates into an occurrence rate of a 1-bit error per 116 Peta Bytes.

 

Cost Saving

Long-term archiving traditionally includes maintenance costs required for long-term storage, manpower and a temperature controlled environment. Optical Disc Archive offers a cost effective archive solution that helps keep long-term storage costs down, therefore optimizing the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO).

 
No Migration

No Migration

As its name indicates, Optical Disc Archive employs optical technologies to maintain inter-generational compatibility, eliminating the need for migration every few years. This helps to eliminate the need for media, hardware and software as well as the cost of manpower resources required to perform copying work, resulting in reduced total cost of ownership.

 

Power Consumption Simulation Over 10 Years

*1 it consumes 20 Watts to read/write. In this example, you use 5 hours (0.5 hours x 10 times) per year for 10 years.

*2 A 2 TB HDD consumes 6 Watts when idle. In this example, you use 50 HDDS for 24 hours over 10 years.

Power Consumption Simulation Over 10 Years
 
Optical Disc

Hypothetical scenario: In Tokyo, data tapes need air conditioning (AC) for a whole year, consuming 25,000 kwh over 10 years. Optical discs only need AC for three summer months, consuming only 10,000 kwh over 10 years.

*3 Optimum storage temperature

Accessibility

Optical Disc Archive features outstanding random read access, making it possible to quickly access required data. For example, the user can play parts of video files he/she wishes to view and required documents can be quickly retrieved from a large number of files, making the operation easier on the end user.

 
The head can be moved freely on the disc.

The head can be moved freely on the disc.

The tape needs to be fast-forwarded/rewound to the position where the required data is located.

The tape needs to be fast-forwarded/rewound to the position where the required data is located.

Capitalizing on the characteristics of random access, Optical Disc Archive offers the ability to play videos without stress or frustration.

 

Sequential Access and Random Access

"Sequential access" refers to reading or writing data records in sequential order, that is, one record after the other. To read record 10, for example, you would first need to read records 1 through 9. This differs from random access, in which you can read and write records in any order.

Sequential Access and Random Access
 
File Access Time

The ODS-D77U/F drive unit is equipped with 4-channel pickup to realize high speed

Maximum Data Access Speed

Although necessitating disc exchanges when the required data is on a different disc, Optical Disc Archive media offers the ability to access data with remarkable speed compared to tape data that necessitates the physical fast-forwarding and rewinding of a tape of approximately 2624 feet (800 meters) or more in length until the location of the required data is reached.

Time taken for one disc exchange on Optical Disc Archive: Approximately 30 seconds.

Time taken to move the head on a data tape with a total length of approximately 2624 feet (800 meters): Approximately 2 minutes 30 seconds.

High Speed

In data archiving, as volumes of data have increased, so too has the need for high-speed data writing and reading. Equipped with a 4ch pickup, which was originally developed by Sony, Optical Disc Archive delivers a maximum transfer rate of 1.1Gbps.

The ODS-D77U/F drive unit is equipped with 4-channel pickup to realize high speed.

For example, a comparison of the time taken to read 5GB of data is shown below. (5GB is approximately 11-12 minutes of 50Mbps video footage on Sony's XDCAM® HD422.)

The head can be moved freely on the disc.
 

Typical Blu-ray drive (6x)
Approximately 190 seconds

Optical Disc Archive Media
Approximately 40 seconds

 

In other words, Optical Disc Archive media offers a read speed at least four times greater than that of Blu-ray disc.

Future Proof

Roadmap

Aiming to achieve higher capacity and faster transfer speeds to handle increasing digital data, Sony is establishing a format roadmap of the Optical Disc Archive system. Using the technology behind 'Archival Disc', a new standard for professional use, next-generation single bare optical disc, the second generation of the Optical Disc Archive is planned to achieve 3.6 TB capacity, and the third generation is planned to achieve an even higher capacity of 6 TB.

The Archival Disc standard uses proven technology to achieve higher capacity. Double-sided discs (3 layers per side) and land-and-groove format technology will be used. Faster transfer speeds are planned, due to the development of multi-channel laser heads on the next-generation drive.

For long-term preservation of assets, the Optical Disc Archive system guarantees inter-generational compatibility. Now and in future, this system delivers an efficient, secure, and reliable archive solution.

No Migration
 

Capacity Expansion

Optical Disc Archive Generation 2 will deliver capacity expansion of up to a maximum of 3.6 TB per cartridge by using the "Archival Disc" planned to be available in 2015 as a bare disc.

 

Archival Disc

The Archival Disc is a next-generation optical disc for professional use formulated by Sony Corporation and Panasonic Corporation in March 2014 with the objective of expanding the market for long-term digital data storage. Archival Disc is a new format with broad compatibility to meet data archive needs that are growing at an ever faster pace as data capacity increases in areas such as long-term archiving in video production that handles large data files, cloud data centers that handle big data and in companies.

 
Archival Disc

The main technologies for the realization of a single 300GB Archival Disc scheduled for implementation in 2015 are shown below. To realize a 300GB capacity, 3 layers are mounted on each side and, in addition, a data writing method known as "Land & Groove" is adopted to enable writing of data of greater density.

 

Disc size (type) 300GB (write-once)

Optical parameters Wavelength λ=405nm (nanometers), Numerical Aperture NA=0.85

Disc structure Double-sided disc (3 layers/side), Land & Groove Format

Track pitch 0.225μm (micrometers)

Data bit length 79.5nm (nanometers)

Error correction method Reed-Solomon Code

Archival Disc Roadmap
 

Increased Speed

Optical Disc Archive Generation 2 uses Sony's original high-speed technology to simultaneously read and write data utilizing a total of eight optical lasers deployed on both sides of the disc to deliver a maximum high-speed data read speed of 2Gbps (*1) and a maximum high-speed data write speed of 1Gbps (with verification) and is capable of astonishing high-speed data processing compared to other archive media.

*1: The 2Gbps (= 250MB/sec) transfer rate is a speed at which one hour of video data in Sony's XDCAM HD422 format (50Mbps) can be transferred in just under approximately 2 minutes and 4K material (XAVC™ 600Mbps) in just under approximately 20 minutes.

 
Assembly in the drive with 2 laser heads {2 channels} mounted

Assembly in the drive with 2 laser heads {2 channels} mounted

Two head assemblies are mounted in the drive and, a total of 8 laser channels are mounted to handle both sides.

Two head assemblies are mounted in the drive and, a total of 8 laser channels are mounted to handle both sides.

 

Backward Compatibility

Archival Disc uses a laser for writing with the same specification as Blu-ray discs, facilitating the maintenance of backward compatibility. Supported by these technological backgrounds, Optical Disc Archive can keep customers' total long-term archive costs to a minimum.

Backward Compatibility

Simple Start

Simple

Optical Disc Archive Drive uses the widely used USB 3.0 as its interface, so that it can be used right away. Moreover, when the Optical Disc Archive Software driver from a PC is compatible with Windows®, Macintosh® and Linux, it can be used without worrying about the OS environment. In addition, Optical Disc Archive Filer that is provided with the driver is an Optical Disc Archive-dedicated copy tool that ensures smoother copying of files to Optical Disc Archive by, for example, helping to minimize the number of disc exchanges required when reading data and enabling the user to specify operations such as stop and resume when an error occurs during copying.

 

Data File Archive

Optical Disc Archive can be used as external storage not only for video files, but also data archives and backup applications. Optical Disc Archive can record all data files that can be handled by a PC (e.g. still images, text, video, Word files) and storage methods, such as by project or hierarchical division, can be freely selected.

 
Data File Archive
 

Easy Handling

Optical Disc Archive incorporates 12 discs into a single cartridge to deliver a large capacity of up to 1.5 TB. Compared to Blu-ray® disc with which no more than only 100GB can be stored on one medium, Optical Disc Archive offers the convenience of being able to handle large volumes of data at once. For example, to store 1 TB of data using 50GB Blu-ray discs, twenty discs have to be inserted into the drive one after the other to write data and care must then be taken when storing discs after writing has been completed to ensure that they do not become separated. With Optical Disc Archive, however, writing can be performed by a drag & drop operation. In addition, because discs on which data has been written are encased in the cartridge, protecting them from contaminants such as dust, the cartridge can be simply stored on a shelf, facilitating subsequent management.

Configurations

 
Easy-to-connect USB 3.0 Interface

Simple and easy shelf archiving using the drive unit

 
Scalable Petasite Library System with MAM Application

Scalable Petasite Library System with MAM Application

 

Digitize Tape-Based Video Assets

Though it's easy to move file-based media and other digital assets to Optical Disc Archive, what about the vast asset libraries currently stored on legacy tape formats? Literally millions of tapes from early Umatic formats to Betacam®, Digital Betacam®, IMX®, HDCAM® and HDCAM SR® currently sit in temperature controlled archival vaults – or worse yet, unprotected on a shelf somewhere. With an approximate 30 year shelf life, many tapes are beginning to go past their prime. It's time to move these valuable historical assets to a more stable, environmentally tolerant format. Sony's PWS-100TD1, Tape Digitize Station, a perfect companion to Optical Disc Archive, is designed specifically for digitizing and archiving tapes quickly and efficiently. The system can control multiple VTRs simultaneously via RS-422 interfaces and offers features such as channel condition check, auto and manual QC and multi codec support.

 
Digitized Tape-Based Video Assets
Digitized Tape-Based Video Assets

Customer Stories

Sony's archiving solution offers reliable and economical long-term storage suitable for broadcast stations, educational institutions, federal and local government agencies, banks, and many others. Learn why these customers selected Sony's Optical Disc Archive solution and how it addressed their video storage needs.

 
 

Sony's Optical Disc Archive - A Crucial Part of Any Production

Toronto-based Allan Schwartzenberger, 'Preditor' – short for producer/editor/director, has made the move to Optical Disc Archive from tape-based LTO because it is simple to operate, reliable and allows random access to content.

Learn more

 
 

Belo Corp. Rolls Out Sony XDNEWS™ Solution

Belo Corp., one of the nation's largest pure-play, publicly-traded television companies, recently rolled out Sony's Media Backbone XDNEWS news production system.

Learn more

 

Ecuador Arts University

The whole system was deployed in a really short time, according to the Arts University deadlines, and the personnel received the necessary training to be able to get the best from VSN's tools

Learn more

 

Jyske Bank of Denmark

"We'd been looking for solutions for several years until we found the right one in Sony."

Learn more

 

The Vatican Video Archive Goes Digital with Optical Disc Archive

Thanks to the stability and durability of ODA cartridges, the Vatican's precious footage will be safe yet easily accessible for many years to come.

Learn more

 

N1 News Channel

"When launching new projects to air our company has a policy of using the most cutting edge, advanced technology in the world."

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Salem, NH, Online and on Cable with Sony Broadcast Technology

A full range of Sony's professional equipment, including an ODS-D77U USB 3.0 Optical Disc Archive drive, will enable a team of volunteers, professionals and students to capture the upcoming political campaigns as part of creating content for three 24/7 cable TV channels as well as online streams.

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Partners

 
 
 
 

Sony Professional Services & Programs

Lower costs, increase control and maximize uptime with Sony, a leader in Professional Services.

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Training

Since 1970, Sony Training Institute, the industry education leader, has trained thousands of video professional like you on the latest service technologies and production techniques. In addition to offering production and post production courses taught with entirely digital or a mixture of digital and analog equipment, Sony Training Institute provides workshops designed specifically to put you on the right track in your transition to digital.

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Locations:

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Mail Stop 1SE
San Jose, CA 95112

123 West Tryon Ave
Teaneck, NJ 07666

Need to Contact Us?

Cameras - Production products are serviced in both our Eastern and Western Services Facilities.

Eastern Service Facility

Sony Electronics Customer Service

123 W. Tryon Ave.

Teaneck, NJ 07666

Phone: 201.833.5300

Fax: 201.833.5312

Western Service Facility

Sony Electronics Customer Service

2706 Media Center Dr., Suite 130

Los Angeles, CA 90065

Phone: 866.766.9272